Reading List

A compendium of the books I've read. (I'm still working on updating/uploading the data.)

★★★★

Little Green Men

By Christopher Buckley

★★★★

Description

The strange land of Washington, D.C., is teeming with aliens, politicians, and other bizarre life-forms. Beltway insider and stuffy talk show host John Oliver Banion finds his privileged life turned topsy-turvy when he is abducted by aliens from his exclusive country-club golf course. When he is abducted a second time, he believes he has found his true calling and, in the most pasionate crusade of his life, demands that Congress and the White House seriously investigate the existence of extraterrestrials and UFOs. Friends and family, meanwhile, urge Banion to seek therapy before his reputation is ruined for good. A comic tour de force from "one of the best and surest political humorists in America" (Los Angeles Times Book Review), Little Green Men is an uproacious comedy of manners that proves once and for all that the truth is out there. Way out there.
★★★★

Who Stole the Funny?: A Novel of Hollywood

By Robby Benson

★★★★

Description

A wickedly delicious roman–a–clef about the making of a sitcom called My Urban Buddies (aka Friends), this satirical romp answers the question for those who ever wondered what went on behind the scenes in the production of their favorite sit–com. Robby Benson can tell you, and does, in the novel WHO STOLE THE FUNNY, in which programmed–for–success director J.T. Baker has to bring an up–and–coming sitcom to fruition after its initial director shoots himself in the head with a nail gun. Thoughtfully annotated with helpful and enlightening Hollywood glossary terms, ("Creative–type director: One who has no hope of working in this town again"; "Eccentric: Affecting a style of dress, coiffure, speech, mannerisms, etc. carefully calculated to give the impression of creative credibility") WHO STOLE THE FUNNY takes place in an exaggerated world of crazy writers, backstabbing directors, foul–mouthed everyone–elses and hardcore cynics.With fast–paced scenes, hilarious dialogue and the ridiculous inner monologues behind them, WHO STOLE THE FUNNY will make you think twice about what's going on behind every innocuous group of urban roommates you've ever fallen for on TGIF.
★★

Sex for America: Politically Inspired Erotica

By Stephen Elliott

★★

Description

Sex for America takes us to the intersection of our desires and our political beliefs. These provocative stories by some of today's best writers, including Anthony Swofford, Jerry Stahl, Rick Moody, and Jonathan Ames, will inspire new discussions of sexual freedom and fascination. A surprising encounter between a lesbian and a young man shipping off to war, a liberal Hill staffer falling for the wife of a Republican senator, and Dick Cheney's duck hunt accident as jilted lover's revenge. See your government—and your most recent sex partners—as you've never seen them before.
★★★★

A Dirty Job (Grim Reaper, #1)

By Christopher Moore

★★★★

Description

Charlie Asher is a pretty normal guy. A little hapless, somewhat neurotic, sort of a hypochondriac. He's what's known as a Beta Male: the kind of fellow who makes his way through life by being careful and constant -- you know, the one who's always there to pick up the pieces when the girl gets dumped by the bigger/taller/stronger Alpha Male.But Charlie's been lucky. He owns a building in the heart of San Francisco, and runs a secondhand store with the help of a couple of loyal, if marginally insane, employees. He's married to a bright and pretty woman who actually loves him for his normalcy. And she, Rachel, is about to have their first child.Yes, Charlie's doing okay for a Beta. That is, until the day his daughter, Sophie, is born. Just as Charlie -- exhausted from the birth -- turns to go home, he sees a strange man in mint-green golf wear at Rachel's hospital bedside, a man who claims that no one should be able to see him. But see him Charlie does, and from here on out, things get really weird. . . .People start dropping dead around him, giant ravens perch on his building, and it seems that everywhere he goes, a dark presence whispers to him from under the streets. Strange names start appearing on his nightstand notepad, and before he knows it, those people end up dead, too. Yup, it seems that Charlie Asher has been recruited for a new job, an unpleasant but utterly necessary one: Death. It's a dirty job. But hey, somebody's gotta do it.Christopher Moore, the man whose Lamb served up Jesus' "missing years" (with the funny parts left in), and whose Fluke found the deep humor in whale researchers' lives, now shines his comic light on the undiscovered country we all eventually explore -- death and dying -- and the results are hilarious, heartwarming, and a hell of a lot of fun.